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Who should get a skin cancer screening and how often?

It’s important to be aware of any changes in your skin, especially if you work outside or do a lot of outdoor activities — not just in the summer but year-round. Self-examine your skin every month to look for anything that is different. People who are considered high risk should be examined by a health care provider. Learn how you can be smarter about sun exposure.

Dermatologist examining a woman's skin during a skin cancer screening

How to prevent screen cancer and detect it.

There are smart ways to block the sun’s rays. Follow them to protect yourself from the sun. It’s also important to be aware of any changes in your skin, especially if you work outside or do a lot of outdoor activities — not just in the summer but year-round. Self-examine your skin every month to look for anything that is different.

Protect your skin.

There are things you can do to stay protected from the sun’s rays. Wear sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher, sunglasses, a wide brim hat, and clothes that cover most of your body. Stay in the shade, under a tree or umbrella, and check your skin often for any changes.

Who should be screened:

If you spend time in the sun, particularly if you work outdoor, you should be screened. You should also be screened regularly if you have a lighter natural skin color, blue or green eyes, blond or red hair, and skin that burns, freckles, reddens easily, or becomes painful in the sun. See a dermatologist if you notice any changes in your skin that look abnormal.

Skin cancer types - Basal Cell Carcinoma and Malignant Melanoma
Skin cancer types - Solar Keratosis Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Stay on top of any skin changes.

Is that rough spot something you should worry about? Here’s a look at four types of skin cancer and their descriptions.

  • Basil cell carcinoma — Can look like a waxy or white bump, a scaly patch or an unhealed sore.
  • Malignant Melanoma — The most serious and potentially deadly skin cancer. It can appear as a pigmented patch or bump, usually as an irregular mole.
  • Solar Keratosis — A precancerous condition that looks like a small rough spot on skin.
  • Squamous Cell Carcinoma — This could appear as an unhealed sore, a red nodule or rough bump.

Causes

What causes skin cancer?

People who are at a higher risk:

Learn more

Learn more about skin cancer:

These links give you skin cancer prevention tips, and they help you learn how to identify moles that could be warning signs and how to stay sun-safe:

Do You Have Enough “Skin in the Game” When It Comes to Sun Safety?
Do You Have Enough “Skin in the Game” When It Comes to Sun Safety?
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6 Facts That Will Get Under Your Skin
6 Facts That Will Get Under Your Skin
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10 Ways to Look Good in a Bathing Suit Forever
10 Ways to Look Good in a Bathing Suit Forever
Read more
What Does Skin Cancer Look Like Anyway?
What Does Skin Cancer Look Like Anyway?
Read more
6 Things You Can’t Control That Could Hurt You
6 Things You Can’t Control That Could Hurt You
Read more
7 Tips to Keep You From Exposing Yourself
7 Tips to Keep You From Exposing Yourself
Read more
5 Skin Cancer Warning Signs In Moles
5 Skin Cancer Warning Signs In Moles
Read more
7 Tips To Keep Kids Safe in the Sun
7 Tips To Keep Kids Safe in the Sun
Read more
4 Ways to Work Outside Without Killing Yourself
4 Ways to Work Outside Without Killing Yourself
Read more
What Are the Odds?
What Are the Odds?
Read more
Focus on Skin Cancer Prevention
Focus on Skin Cancer Prevention
Read more
How to Prevent a Sneaky Sunburn
How to Prevent a Sneaky Sunburn
Read more
Skin Cancer: What Young Adults Need to Know
Skin Cancer: What Young Adults Need to Know
Read more
Some Spots You Don’t Want to Find
Some Spots You Don’t Want to Find
Read more

Testimonials

Stories about skin cancer:

Nurse Navigators

Delaware nurse navigators can help you get screened for cancer.

Whether you have insurance or not, Delaware nurse navigators can help you get screened for cancer and provide follow-up help when you get your results. Choose from the list below to call a nurse navigator directly, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., or click the call request button to have a nurse navigator contact you.

A Nurse Navigator on the phone supporting a patient
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